Dating christ execution

That then dates the death of Herod the Great into the first year of the current era, four years after the usual date. Cramer argues that Herod the Great most likely died shortly after the lunar eclipse of December 29, 1 B. C., which, as Cramer points out, is the eclipse traditionally associated with Josephus’s description in 17.6.4 (Queries & Comments, “When Was Jesus Born? Correlation of Josephus with the Talmud and Mishnah indicate the fast was probably Yom Kippur. It was a total eclipse that became noticeable several hours after sundown, but it is widely regarded as too early to fit other information on the date. This was a partial eclipse that commenced after midnight. dates require either that the fast was not Yom Kippur or that the calendar was rejiggered for some reason.Perhaps the much-maligned monk who calculated the change of era was not quite so far off as has been supposed. Cramer Professor of Physics Oglethorpe University Atlanta, Georgia When Was Jesus Born? ” BAR, July/August 2013) and which is used as a basis to reckon Jesus’ birth shortly before 4 B. Professor Cramer’s argument was made in the 19th century by scholars such as Édouard Caspari and Florian Riess. Yom Kippur occurs on the tenth day of the seventh month (mid-September to mid-October) and Passover on the 15th day of the first month (March or April) of the religious calendar. It hardly seems a candidate for being remembered and noted by Josephus. The January 10 eclipse was total but commenced shortly before midnight on a winter night.Jesus, as described in the New Testament, was most likely crucified on Friday April 3, 33 A. The latest investigation, reported in the journal International Geology Review, focused on earthquake activity at the Dead Sea, located 13 miles from Jerusalem.The Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27, mentions that an earthquake coincided with the crucifixion: "And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open.” NEWS: Biblical Burial Box Reveals Clue About Death of Jesus To analyze earthquake activity in the region, geologist Jefferson Williams of Supersonic Geophysical and colleagues Markus Schwab and Achim Brauer of the German Research Center for Geosciences studied three cores from the beach of the Ein Gedi Spa adjacent to the Dead Sea.Varves, which are annual layers of deposition in the sediments, reveal that at least two major earthquakes affected the core: a widespread earthquake in 31 B. and a seismic event that happened sometime between the years 26 and 36.At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The latter period occurred during "the years when Pontius Pilate was procurator of Judea and when the earthquake of the Gospel of Matthew is historically constrained," Williams said.

The full moon following the harvest moon frequently is called the hunter’s moon, though the term blood moon occasionally is used.

A totally eclipsed moon often has a red appearance, though the colors orange, yellow, gray, and even black are possible too.

Because the most common color of a totally eclipsed moon is red, in recent years people increasingly have called an eclipsed moon a blood moon. However, only a totally eclipsed moon assumes an unusual color, and even a totally eclipsed moon may assume a color other than red.

Geologists say Jesus, as described in the New Testament, was most likely crucified on Friday, April 3, in the year 33.

The latest investigation, reported in International Geology Review, focused on earthquake activity at the Dead Sea, located 13 miles from Jerusalem.

Both Luke and Matthew mention Jesus’ birth as occurring during Herod’s reign (Luke 1:5; Matthew 2:1). This is generally regarded as a reference to a lunar eclipse in 4 B. Therefore it is often said that Jesus was born in 4 B. C., which would place Herod’s death—and Jesus’ birth—at the turn of the era. This date is based on Josephus’s remark in 17.6.4 that there was a lunar eclipse shortly before Herod died. Using so-called inclusive counting, this, too, places Herod’s death in 4 B. Third, we know that the reign over Samaria and Judea of Herod’s son and successor Archelaus began in 4 B. The difficulty is that we have a fair amount of information, but it is equivocal.

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