Christian dating frequently asked questions

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Additionally it would be appropriate to meet up with other Christian singles for friendship where this is desired.

We believe that from a biblical and practical viewpoint it is better not to get involved in romantic dating whilst separated until any unavoidable finality of separation is brought to closure through divorce.

But that doesn't mean they aren't occasionally hounded by struggles—or haunted by tough questions. And what are they supposed to do with occasional lonely feelings—year after year?

Let's say you've asked the right questions and you've been careful about the people you date. Words and phrases like "smothered" and "jealous" come to mind. Do both of you clearly understand why sex outside of marriage is so destructive? If your friends or family complain that they don't see you anymore, your relationship has gotten way too exclusive. Do your best to begin each date knowing how you're going to spend your time together. Do we have a good understanding of what forgiveness means? Holding grudges because you've been wronged kills a relationship.

In time, you'll probably find yourself liking one person a lot. If you find yourself moving in this direction, or if you are already in a serious relationship, here are other questions to think through and to talk about together: 1. A relationship can't survive without honesty and openness. If you have to be somebody you're not, or if either of you feels you must put up a front, then you're in the wrong relationship. If one of you can't move without the other one knowing it, then possessiveness is a big problem. If you break up tomorrow, would you end the relationship with no regrets about your physical involvement? On the other hand, no one should say "forgive me" when they really mean "accept my faults and don't expect me to change." If you want to regain trust, if you want to keep the relationship healthy, then changes must be made.

You are blind to the faults of the other and consumed with being noticed by him or her.

Your need to be liked is so strong that you are willing to give up your own personality or morals for the other’s affection.

For answers to some of the most challenging of these queries, we turned to Virginia Mc Inerney, a single woman who's a regular speaker at her megachurch in Ohio, and who wrote Single Not Separate (Charisma House), which tackles these and many other difficult singleness issues head-on.

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